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Copper Wire and Your Everyday Life

The use of copper wire has been commonplace since the 1820s, and is a popular choice for all types of electrical applications. It is a powerful conductor, physically strong and durable, corrosion-resistant, easy to install and easy to solder. With all of these benefits, copper has a secure spot in the electrical wiring industry. This ubiquitous wire affects most people on a daily basis—in fact, you’re probably taking advantage of copper wiring at this very moment.

Industrial Electric Wire and Cable

The cable that goes from your wall to your cable box or modem is very likely a copper cable—it is a popular choice for communications cables like telephone lines and coaxial cable. Though coaxial cable is shielded, you can actually see the copper when you unplug it. Unscrew the cable from your television and look into the end—you should see a small, thin rod. This is actually the cable, and it’s the part that plugs into an equally tiny hold in your television. This tiny bit of copper wire is all it takes to transfer the vast amounts of information that you access when you watch TV or surf the web.

Copper Wire In and Out of the Home

Because of all of its strengths, copper wire is used for all manner of applications, both in and outside of the home. In fact, when you purchase a home, it may be designated as an “all copper” home, meaning that all of the industrial electric wire and cable in the building is made from this powerful conductor.

Copper is also used in the construction of appliances and other motorized devices, including everything from wristwatches and microwaves to cars and power tools. In some of these cases, the copper wire is bare, while in others, it’s insulated. This type of wire comes in other varieties, as well, including solid and stranded. Solid wires are more common in applications that don’t require the wire to ever move, while stranded copper wires—which are made of groups that are pinched and rolled together—are comparably more flexible and easy to install.

To learn more about the different types of copper wire and its applications, contact Arcor Electronics.